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Planning and Common Sense

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Cape Crusaders Renew Battle At Council Against Red Light Cameras

Every council member knows citizen activists are dangerous when they can turn out numbers repeatedly at council meetings. If they have a Facebook page, a clever acronym and fancy T-shirts they are even more formidable. C.A.P.E. has all four.

For the second straight month, Citizens Against Photo Enforcement members spoke at the council’s monthly “open mic” session Thursday night. They attacked  the city’s decision to hire a company to install the cameras and monitor videotapes of alleged violations these cameras record.

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Boro 2035: Hooking Up With The Region To Form An Aviation Corridor

The consultant the city hired to help deal with the next two decades of rapid growth here believes the boro’s economic future lies in greater cooperation with Nashville and other cities in the region.

By getting involved in regional initiatives — ranging from rapid transit to regional planning and marketing campaigns — Murfreesboro can piggyback on Nashville’s powerful economic engine.

  • What follows comes from a draft of the consultant’s economic chapter, which was passed out for comments several months ago and is subject to change.

Continue reading “Boro 2035: Hooking Up With The Region To Form An Aviation Corridor”

Commission Gets Vision Of Past, Glimpse Of Future In Two Projects

Double Feature at the City Hall Bijou:

***Two stirring planning commission melodramas.***

  1. “Back To The Past”: A nostalgic flick starring a single family subdivision that could put as many as 750 lots near the I-24-SR 840 Interchange. The area around the interchange itself is considered an ideal candidate for a corporate center.
  2. “Back To The Future”: Plans for 203 luxury apartments in the city’s gateway district. It’s a project that calls out a welcome to talented millennials who crave urban living.

Continue reading “Commission Gets Vision Of Past, Glimpse Of Future In Two Projects”

2/13/16: That WasThe Week That Was; Dinner For Lawmakers At Chez Mairie

The annexation issue isn’t even on the radar, our representatives at the capital told city officials and council members Thursday night.

Dining on deli cuisine in the council chambers*, city officials met with State Sens. Bill Ketron and Jim Tracy as well as state Reps. Dawn White and Bryan Terry.

The informal meeting offered city council members a chance to tell the lawmakers what their priorities are and for the lawmakers to tell local officials what legislation looms in the capital.

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2/6/16 This Is The Week That Was In The City By The Scenic Stones River

[Note: This roundup is an experiment. It will be awfully long for something online. The hope is that subheads will enable you to go to items that interest you rather than get bleary eyed reading the whole thing.]

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2035 Primer: We Give You The Meat Without $50 Words Planners Love

There is always a problem when people write to impress their readers rather than communicate ideas in simple terms. In this series, which has been voted best in Murfreesboro for five straight years, we give you what the city’s planning consultant is saying without all the highfalutin’  talk. We believe the days when we could impress anyone are long past.

You can read the existing draft chapters of the plan by clicking http://www.murfreesborotn.gov/index.aspx?NID=764 It’s a terrific cure for insomnia.

But why not cheat and read our “Cliff’s Notes” type summaries of what’s in the plan? We guarantee we can get you a passing grade on the final. Here are articles we have posted on the study so far:

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Save The Church: An Artists Center Could Lure Millennials To City

[Ed.note: This is the first in our long-awaited and award-winning series on saving the former United Methodist Church in downtown Murfreesboro. Like an area jewelry store, this blog has been voted best in its field for five straight years.]

“In my opinion the trees are just as valuable to the land as the (historic Springfield) house is. I could go tear down the house and build another one that looks just like it. Not that I’m gonna do that. … I feel very strongly about keeping the trees.” — Charles Haskett, a developer who plans to build luxury apartments off Manson Pike.

“Mayor aims to ‘protect our downtown’.” — Headline from the Murfreesboro Post. The headline makes one believe that the mayor will fight to save the former Methodist Church at East College and North Church Streets. Three cheers for the mayor!

Continue reading “Save The Church: An Artists Center Could Lure Millennials To City”

Opportunities: “Play It Again, Sam” And Smooth Out The Wrinkles

A city can get a sense of place by being known for its economic specialty. Pittsburgh, for better or worse, was known for its steel mills. St. Louis and Milwaukee became famous for their beers. Chicago’s most famous products were arguably meat packing, wind and Al Capone.

In its planning study for the next two decades of explosive growth here, the Kendig Keast Collaborative offers several suggestions for Murfreesboro to find an economic niche. We’ll look at one possibility in this space today and more in the days to come.

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If Boro Population Doubles In 20 Years, We’ll Have To Pay To Improve Roads

Maybe they only travel by helicopter.
“Maybe foes of raising the gas tax only travel by helicopter.”

I recently saw a post from Americans For Prosperity-Tennesse, an adjunct of the national group the Koch Bothers set up. They are proclaiming victory in blocking the governor’s pitch for a gas-tax increase.

In our view, that is a Pyrrhic victory for the people living here now. It has been our position that growth is inevitable here, but it should be responsible growth that is planned for.

Continue reading “If Boro Population Doubles In 20 Years, We’ll Have To Pay To Improve Roads”

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